February

One womans battle: Why a nation changed course

EFFINGHAM, Ill. — Gail Warner, 39, lives in her southern Illinois “dream house,” a few miles from here. Her husband is a loan officer at a local bank. Her son, who will turn 15 in June, is a high school freshman and her daughter, 3, has been through nine surgeries to correct a birth defect.

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The extraordinary life of Marvel Cooke

At the intersection of African American History and Women's History months is a long list of Black women who have made history as civil rights, labor and peace activists, educators, scientists, elected officials, physicians, astronauts, artists and much more.

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Iraq vet faces new battle worker rights at home

CHICAGO — “The irony of it all – Bush got on TV and said we were in Iraq because we had to get rid of weapons of mass destruction, stop terrorism and spread democracy over there. I served my country honorably over there only to come back home to a place where, as a worker, I don’t even have the right to union representation. The companies hold all the cards. They do us serious hurt if we try to exercise our rights.”

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America agrees with president: Its about jobs, jobs, jobs

CHICAGO — Cindy Green, 41, is a clerk at Citibank. Her husband, who repaired air conditioners and heating units, lost his job 28 weeks ago. “I am scared to death about this,” she said, “because everything we have worked so hard for seems like it can fall apart. What if my husband can’t find another job? My son graduated with a BA last June and so far landed jobs only at Old Navy and Starbuck’s.”

Show us the green!

Blue-Green Alliance urges ‘green jobs’ investment WASHINGTON — Shawn Grimes, 30, who makes batteries for hybrid autos was one of more than 2000 people who converged on the nation’s capital to demand that Congress fund programs that create more “green jobs” like his.

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1.5 million to Capitol Hill: Pass Employee Free Choice Act

WASHINGTON (PAI)--Before a chilled crowd of almost 4,000 people, and standing among boxes named by state and symbolizing the 1.4 million cards, letters and e-mails sent to Congress, organized labor launched this year’s drive to pass the Employee Free Choice Act, with a boisterous outdoor D.C. rally on Feb. 4.