May

More voters facing unfair barriers

Texas may now be the latest state to enact new Jim Crow-like restrictions on American voters.

Down by the riverside, new nukes

Over the past year, a group of nuclear physicists has been studying a site on the banks of a beautiful river. Hidden from international nuclear inspectors, they are drawing up plans for a new facility, possibly along this river, designed to perform research on plutonium and build new nuclear bombs by the year 2020.

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CARTOON

The real buzz about disappearing bees

There is much excitement in the newspapers and on the radio and TV about the mysterious disappearing honeybees. Many people were not aware of this, but it is true that one-third of our food depends on honeybees for pollination.

How a Karl Rove PowerPoint presentation works

I first heard of Karl Rove on July 30, 2003. Tom Hamburger’s Wall Street Journal story about Rove’s PowerPoint presentation to officials at the Department of the Interior finally revealed to me, as they say, the man behind the curtain.

EDITORIAL: Police riot in Los Angeles

After the massive demonstration for immigrant rights in Los Angeles on May 1, millions of television viewers nationwide watched horrified as helmeted cops swung clubs and fired shotguns into crowds of peaceful marchers and at well-known Spanish-language news personalities.

EDITORIAL: A terrorist goes free

Cuban exile Luis Posada was to have been tried in El Paso, Texas, May 11. But on May 8, U.S. District Judge Kathleen Cardone dismissed fraud charges related to his illegal entry into the U.S. two years ago. Now Posada will go back to his wife’s home in Miami.

THIS WEEK IN LABOR

Union membership would double with EFCA NLRB opens new attack on unions Workers who missed lunch get back pay Unions try to block Detroit giveaway

Healthy planet a low priority for capitalism

The capitalist class is incapable of reversing the destruction of humanity’s environment, for deep social, economic and political reasons.

Consumers fight soaring electric rates

CHICAGO — At the end of a 10-year rate freeze in Illinois, electric rates are projected to increase between 22 percent and 55 percent statewide. Customers, especially in southern Illinois, have already seen their bills double and triple.

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