November

The Nuremberg trials: lessons for today

In a web site devoted to history’s “famous trials,” law professor Douglas Lindner writes: “No trial provides a better basis for understanding the nature and causes of evil than do the Nuremberg trials from 1945 to 1949. Those who come to the trials expecting to find sadistic monsters are generally disappointed. What is shocking about Nuremberg is the ordinariness of the defendants: men who may be good fathers, kind to animals, even unassuming — yet who committed unspeakable crimes.”

Editorial: On to 2006

In the same hotel where California Gov. Arnold Schwarznegger held his 2003 election night party, the California Nurses Association danced in a conga line this Nov. 8 celebrating the ballot box spanking they helped give Schwarzenegger.

Its time to honor Ben Davis

The following is excerpted from a speech given at a tribute to the life of former New York City Councilman Benjamin J. Davis, held at New York’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on Oct. 16.The author is executive vice chair of the Communist Party USA.

Bird flu on the wing

Danger of pandemic is real, but technology exists to deal with it if sufficient resources are allocated A flu pandemic is a global outbreak of disease that occurs when a new influenza A virus appears in the human population, causes serious illness, and then spreads easily from person to person worldwide. Pandemics are different from seasonal outbreaks of flu that are caused by a new variety of an old flu that already has circulated among people.

Rove caught cheating in White House ethics class

Top aide seen looking at Cheney’s paper during pop quiz Just days after President George W. Bush ordered the White House staff to take what was called a “refresher” course on ethics, his top aide Karl Rove was caught cheating during the first pop quiz given in the course, the White House confirmed today.

Transit worker victory in Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA — Buses, subways and trolleys began running again here early Monday morning Nov. 7 as members of Transportation Workers Union Local 234 and United Transportation Union Local 1594 returned to work with a new four-year contract. The weeklong strike by 5,300 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority workers forced the agency to back off its demand that the transit workers pay 5 percent co-pays on their health insurance premiums.

This week in labor

‘Everyone stuck together’; Derailment averted; America’s ‘Roads scholars’; Unions form Delphi coalition;Boeing strikers in Ala. free speech victory

Canadian teachers force govt retreat

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — After two weeks of striking in defiance of government anti-strike laws, British Columbia’s 38,000 public school teachers returned to the classroom Oct. 24, strongly united for the next round of battles for the education system. Members of the B.C. Teachers Federation (BCTF) voted 77.6 percent to support their leadership’s call to accept settlement terms proposed by mediator Vince Ready.

World Notes

Russia: Ford workers strike; Canada: Labor vows solidarity with indigenous peoples; Uruguay: Health workers strike; Nigeria: Charge new human rights violations; Korean Peninsula: Working together for Olympics

Holiday canceled, but 200,000 celebrate Russian Revolution

Though the long-standing Nov. 7 holiday celebrating the anniversary of the Russian Revolution has been canceled, press reports indicate that nearly 200,000 people throughout the country observed the holiday anyway, with rallies, demonstrations and ceremonies.

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