Keystone XL struck down for now

After receiving a total of 59 votes in the Senate – 45 Republican, 14 Democratic – a bill that would approve Keystone XL came one vote shy of its needed support on Nov. 19, putting a stopper on the troubling project for now. The victory settled the nerves of environmentalists and spared President Obama the task of vetoing the legislation, as he was likely to have done. Though the GOP has vowed to renew the fight to push the project through, those who value the safety of nature and people, including indigenous groups throughout the U.S., can now celebrate a moment of triumph.

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., staked her hopes of winning a fourth Senate term on the Keystone measure, engaging in frantic last-minute lobbying, especially trying to acquire the needed votes from her fellow Democrats – the majority of whom, alongside Obama, wholly oppose the bill. “I’m going to fight for the people of my state until the day that I leave,” Landrieu claimed. Her efforts were seen by many as unwise, especially as her state – a long-embattled victim of Big Oil in its own right – had nothing to gain from the project’s approval, as the pipeline would not go through Louisiana, and would thus create no jobs there. This is a particularly important point, as it rendered her statement rather hollow.

For the Republican Party’s part, they will gain an additional eight or more Senate seats in 2015, and are expected to seize that opportunity next year to try and ram the legislation through once more. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who will become Senate Majority Leader in January, said, “I look forward to the new Republican majority taking up and passing the Keystone ‘jobs bill’ early in the New Year.” The GOP’s language surrounding the bill, which emphasizes job creation and support for working families, is alarmingly misleading, as several labor unions pointed out yesterday. This is because it will not generate the job numbers that Republicans suggest, and moreover, will pose a risk to the environment that most Democrats, and the President, agree is not worth taking. Nevertheless, the GOP will likely try again in January or February, and might even try and integrate the measure into a broader bill that Obama would find harder to veto.

Landrieu asked, “What is everybody upset about?” from the Senate floor on Nov. 18, adding, “We already have 2.6 million miles of pipe in America.” But environmental activists and those affected by the oil industry have been answering that question since the project’s inception back in 2008.

“If she wants this pipeline so badly, it can go through her front yard and not any one of ours,” said Karthik Ganapathy, communications manager for environmental advocacy group 350 Action. “For somebody that had the Gulf oil spill and the devastation it brought to her state, she should understand how important it is that we don’t have these types of environmental disasters,” added Art Tanderup, a Nebraska farmer and member of the Cowboy Indian Alliance, a group uniting workers and Native Americans against the pipeline.

Environmental groups are excited about this temporary victory, but it is tempered by an ongoing sense of uncertainty. Still, many believe the President will make the right decision, despite Republican efforts to fight him tooth and nail on this issue. “Since day one, the decision on the Keystone XL pipeline has belonged to President Obama,” said Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune. “And he has repeatedly said he will reject this pipeline if it contributes to the climate crisis. As there is no doubt that it does, we remain confident that is precisely what he’ll do.”

Photo: AP


CONTRIBUTOR

Blake Skylar
Blake Skylar

Blake is production manager, responsible for the assembly of the PW home page. As a writer, he has also covered issues including the BP oil spill in New Orleans and the UN Climate Conference in Paris, earning him awards from the IWPA and ILCA. He lives in Illinois and frequently visits his home state of New Jersey. He likes cats, red wine, books, music, and nature. Using the pen name "Blake X," he writes a blog that can be found at blakedeppe.com.

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