Protests rock Chicago bankers conference

CHICAGO — Chanting “ABA you’re the worst, time to put the people first,” over 1,000 people confronted the officers of some of America’s biggest banks today, Oct. 26, on the second of three days of protest during an ABA (American Bankers Association) conference. Tomorrow on the third day thousands more, including AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and Change to Win president Anna Burger, will demonstrate in the name of taxpayers, retirees, family farmers, clergy, workers, students, homeowners, and community allies.

Today’s protest also included protesters taking over the lobby of Goldman Sachs Chicago Headquarters demanding that the officers accept a letter from people hurt by their policies. Protesters carried signs demanding rigorous re-regulation of banks and financial institutions and for breaking up the biggest banks deemed “too big to fail.”


Scott Marshall
Scott Marshall

Scott Marshall is a vice chair of the Communist Party and chair of its Labor Commission. Scott grew up in Virginia where he first became active in the civil rights movement in high school, working on voter registration and anti-Klan projects in rural Southern Virginia and Tennessee. He was also active against the war in Vietnam.

Scott has been a life long trade unionist and was active in rank and file reform movements in the Teamsters, Machinists and Steelworkers unions in the 1970s and '80s. He was co-chair of the Save Our Jobs committee of USWA local 1834 at Pullman Standard in Chicago and active in nationwide organizing against plant shutdowns and layoffs. He was a founder of the unemployed organization Jobs or Income Now (Join), in Chicago, and the National Congress of Unemployed Organizations in the 1980s.

Scott has worked for the Communist Party since 1987 when he became the district organizer for the party in Illinois, a post he held until he was elected chair of the National Labor Commission in 1997. Scott remains active in SOAR (Steelworkers Active Organized Retirees). He lives in Chicago.