Science news roundup: meals, toys, and TV endanger kids

Following are links to some of the most interesting science stories reported this week relating to both political and social affairs and health news from which everyone may benefit. You can comment on these reports at the end of the round up:

Kids meals, toys, and TV advertising: A triple threat to child health

Despite the fact that scientists have shown that the foods provided at fast food restaurants are antithetical to children’s health the government has failed to issue regulations preventing fast food companies from luring children to their dens by offering toys as incentives by means of ads aired on federally  regulated airwaves.

Negative publicity reduces police motivation but does not result in depolicing

Well the FBI director and other right-wingers have had their say about the “Ferguson Effect” but the scientific study above shows how wrong they are. There has been no increase in crime as a result of protests against the police killing unarmed minority people and acts of racial profiling. If anything is specifically responsible for the statistically insignificant “crime increase” it’s the cut in funding for public safety due to austerity measures in response to capitalism’s ongoing decline.

New research shows how to make effective political arguments, sociologist says

The gist is to use your opponent’s moral system not your own when you frame your arguments to persuade them to adopt your position. This is not “new” it is an old lawyers trick as well as a technique of rhetoric and debate. If someone quotes the Bible to support his position, then find a quote that supports your position and try and convince him what you believe is really biblical. This article further expains how this method works. Socialists should bone up on Adam Smith.

Sitting for long periods not bad for health, suggest researchers

New hope for couch potatoes!

Global marine analysis suggests food chain collapse

This research indicates that as CO2 increases in the oceans the food chain will collapse from top to bottom.  Larger marine life forms will disappear along with animals that need shells to survive. Micro organisms will increase however. Future oceans will be thinned or without  life forms currently abundant. Every bit of gas, oil, and coal we use hastens the day!

Photo: Thinkstock (Stock photo)


CONTRIBUTOR

Thomas Riggins
Thomas Riggins

Thomas Riggins is associate editor of Political Affairs. Reach him at pabooks@politicalaffairs.net.

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