Labor News


Right wing legal schemes may enmesh UAW Volkswagen rerun vote case

The tangle over UAW's loss at Chattanooga is important to workers nationwide because this union recognition election saw massive anti-union intervention by outside-funded right wing groups.


Today in labor history: The International Labor Organization founded

After the devastation of WWI, a commission was established to pursue a vision based on the premise that universal, lasting peace can be established only if it is based on social justice, and the ILO was founded.


Today in labor history: SNCC founder Julian Bond was born

Today people from around the country and globe are wishing the long time civil rights giant, Julian Bond, a very happy birthday.


Floridians put Walmart on trial

The people's verdict following the 15-minute mock trial: Guilty on all counts, including worker abuse, misuse of taxpayer funds and destroying the American economy.


Plant owner gets 20 years in slammer for workers' deaths

OSHA's investigation of the 2010 explosion at a gunpowder plant in Colebrook, N.H., resulted in the issuance of 16 willful and more than 30 serious safety violation citations, along with a $1.2 million penalty


Report: Nissan in Mississippi is violating international labor law

The company is in violation of the standards on freedom of association, the report notes, because of Nissan's "aggressive interference" with workers attempting to exercise their fundamental right to organize a union.


Palestinian union leader seeks support from U.S. unions

Labor leader Mahmoud Abu Odeh is hoping American trade unionists will help Palestinian workers achieve basic rights. He says it is a question of human needs shared by Americans, Palestinians and Israelis.


Iraqi union leader: "War not over for our workers"

Hassan Juma'a Awad, president of the Iraq Federation of Oil Unions, was a guest at the AFL-CIO's convention where he spoke at an event organized by U.S. Labor Against the War.


Today in labor history: Motley becomes first black woman federal judge

On Aug. 30, 1966, civil rights lawyer Constance Baker Motley became the first African American woman to serve as a federal judge.


NLRB judge: Firm’s ‘arbitration agreement’ with workers can’t ban appeals to board

The ban violates the worker's labor law rights, ALJ Melissa Olivero ruled on August 14 in a case involving Fort Lauderdale-based Everglades University.

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