Labor News

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Today in labor history: 100,000 march on D.C. for ERA

On July 9, 1978, over 100,000 marched on Washington D.C. in support of the Equal Rights Amendment.

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Today in labor history: Labor organizer "Mother" Bloor born

On July 8, 1862, labor organizer and leading communist Ella Reeve "Mother" Bloor was born on Staten Island, N.Y.

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Today in labor history: Activist Agnes Nestor born

On June 24, 1880, labor and women's rights activist Agnes Nestor was born in Grand Rapids, Mich. She moved to Chicago in 1897 and started working at the age of 14 in the glove industry 

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Today in labor history: The 1937 "Women's Day Massacre"

On June 19, 1937, police in Youngstown, Ohio, used tear gas on women and children, including at least one infant in his mother's arms, during the historic strike at Republic Steel.

Female corrections officers get class status for sex harassment complaint

Over objections of Bureau of Prisons, the federal Justice Department agreed that female federal prison corrections officers, employed at the Coleman complex, suffered sexual harassment as a class.

 

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Today in labor history: Kennedy signs bill to overcome sexism in pay

On this day in 1963, President John F. Kennedy passed the Equal Pay Act aimed at eliminating unequal pay for women.

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Today in labor history: Massachusetts establishes first minimum wage

Much later, in 1938, the country would get a federal minimum wage law under the Fair Labor Standards Act. But this initial law was still a powerful move.

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Today in labor history: Int'l Ladies Garment Workers Union founded

Today in labor history in 1900 the International Ladies Garment Workers Union was founded in New York City by seven local unions, with a few thousand members between them.

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Today in labor history: Rosie the Riveter dies at 77

Rose Will Monroe, who became famous as "Rosie the Riveter," died on May 31, 1997. During World War II, Monroe went to work in the aircraft industry as a riveter making parts for military airplanes.

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On anniversary of free trade deal, Colombian workers face turning point

After decades of displacement, war and poverty, workers in Colombia face the possibility of a better life.

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