Labor News

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-arestedindallas.jpg

Buried in my grave, before I'll be a Walmart slave!

Walmart workers striking for higher wages here have added the element of song to their picketing, marching and chanting.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-wwages520x2.jpg

Workers plan nationwide strikes against "bully" Walmart

"Walmart is just a bully, and people across the country are starting to see the real Walmart, that's why I continue to stand up, because the time for change is now."

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-jacklondon450x350.jpg

Today in labor history: Jack London, writer, socialist, dies at 40

Best known to U.S. readers as the author of Call of the Wild, London also wrote several powerful works dealing with workers, capitalism and socialism - including his famous dystopian novel The Iron Heel.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-timeclock.jpg

Today in labor history: Employee time clock invented

On this day in 1888, the employee time clock was invented by Willard Bundy, a jeweler in Auburn, N.Y. Bundy's brother Harlow started mass producing them a year later.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-Moltensteel520x434.jpg

Today in labor history: Supreme Court used Taft-Hartley Act to break a steel strike

In 1947 the 81st Congress, controlled by Republicans for the first time since 1930, overruled President Truman's veto and rammed the Taft-Hartley Law through Congress, severely limited strike activities .

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-Wgarally.JPG

Today in labor history: Hollywood writers begin epic strike

On Nov. 5, 2007, some 12,000 movie and television writers were forced to go on strike over when industry executives refused to structure compensation in their contract for content delivered over the Internet and via DVDs.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-reaganmeese520x358.jpg

Today in labor history: Meese tells employers to spy on workers

Ed Meese, attorney general (the main legal advisor to the government) in the Ronald Reagan administration, urged employers to begin spying on workers.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-strike447x300.jpg

Today in Labor History: Clayton Antitrust Act signed

On October 15, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signs the Clayton Antitrust Act establishing that unions are not "conspiracies" under the law.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-nosandwich520x304.jpg

Subway fires worker for giving a 3-year-old a cookie

We've heard of ridiculous excuses companies use to fire pro-union workers, but a Seattle Subway shop takes the cake...er, cookie. Working Washington reports the firm fired Carlos Hernandez for giving a 66-cent cookie, free, to a 3-year-old.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-Noordam-delegates-1915454x300.jpg

Today in labor history: Labor journalist Mary Heaton Vorse is born

 

She reported on the Lawrence textile strike, the steel strike of 1919, the textile workers strike of 1934, and coal strikes in Harlan County, Kentucky. After reporting on the Loray Mill strike in Gastonia, N. C., in 1929, she wrote her famous novel, "Strike!"

14 5 6 7 829