Labor News


Yuengling Brewery billionaire pushes "right-to-work" in my home county

Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, where I grew up, is famous for two things: anthracite coal and union organizing.


Unions celebrate LGBTQ progress, say challenges remain

To become more inclusive, to increase efforts to protect transgender workers and to fight for state laws that prevent employers from firing workers for their sexual orientation or gender expression.


Union activist sees new unity, new day for labor movement

My members, along with hundreds of labor, community, faith and student allies, have arrived to show support to fast food workers organizing for $15-an hour and a union.


UFCW on a roll in southern California

Unionists ratified a new contract with the area's big food chains, and Local 770 passed the 100-store organizing mark at CVS, adding 2,000 members.


Today in labor history: Mass. first state to pass minimum wage

"The industry employing her is in receipt of the working energy of a human being at less than its cost, and to that extent is parasitic."


Sweetheart deal with Staples results in postal cuts in San Francisco

"This is a plan to close Post Offices and outsource postal work. A sign on the door that says 'We're closed, go to Staples.' It couldn't get much more obvious.


Seattle makes history: Council OKs $15 minimum wage

Fast food workers at the council meeting reportedly cried after the vote.


St. Louis workers rally to support fired Jimmy John's employee

Rasheen Aldridge, an organizer with Show Me $15, has been fired because of his role as a protest organizer.


Baltimore hospital workers strike for low-paid workers

The union's wage proposal would add 0.32 percent to Hopkins' $754 million payroll costs; in 2013, Hopkins reported a surplus of $145 million.


Hartford fast-food workers protest wage theft

Fast-food workers and community and faith leaders protested systemic wage theft in the industry,  just after the first-ever national poll of fast-food workers showed companies lare stealing money from 89 percent of their employees. 

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