Labor News


Today in labor history: Striking and saving lives

January 23 is, like most days, a day to remember in labor history.


Today in labor history: United Mine Workers founded

Contrary to what right-wing politicians would have us believe, labor unions have been part of the fabric of American society for a very long time.


Today in labor history: Steel workers walk off jobs in industry's largest work stoppage

On this day in 1946, some 750,000 steel workers walked off the job in the largest work stoppage in the industry.


Today in labor history: Federal employees gain right to collective bargaining

On January 17, 1962, President John Kennedy signs Executive Order 10988, recognizing the right of federal employees to bargain collectively.


Today in labor history: Leonard Woodcock born

Leonard Woodcock  was born to Ernest Woodcock and Margaret Freel  in Providence, R.I. in February 15, 1911. 


Today in labor history: Martin Luther King, Jr. born

In a 1965 speech, King stated, "The labor movement was the principal force that transformed misery and despair into hope and progress."


At Nissan and beyond, workers' rights are civil rights

Thanks to the works of those who came before us, this new generation is equipped with the knowledge of how to make change, and it is become more and more apparent what we need to fight for.




Today in labor history: Tompkins Square Riot

The NYC police, on Jan. 13, 1874, overran a demonstration by thousands of unemployed in Tompkins Square Park in the neighborhood now called the East Village.



Today in labor history: Stephen Hawking born

As recently as 2011, Hawking remarked, "Scientists have become the bearers of the torch of discovery in our quest for knowledge."


Today in labor history: Author Zora Neale Hurston is born

On this day in 1891, Zora Neale Hurston, novelist and folklorist, was born. She is seen as one of the most important black writers in American history.

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