Labor News


Today in labor history: Paul Robeson loses passport appeal

On August 16, 1955, internationally known actor, singer and activist Paul Robeson lost his court appeal to force the U.S. State Department to grant him a passport.


Today in labor history: Power blackout saps Northeast

On this day in 2003, the Northeast of the United States and Canada experienced a massive blackout, which affected 50 million people.


Today in labor history: Seattle Post-Intelligencer strike takes place

The Post-Intelligencer is owned by the Hearst Corporation, which, at the time, was notorious for anti-unionism and anti-communism.


Today in labor history: Mexican leader Emilano Zapata born

Zapata headed the land reform struggles of Mexican farmers and was a leader of the Mexican revolution.


Today in labor history: No more Hiroshimas or Nagasakis

The United States dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, Aug. 9, 1945, three days after the bombing of Hiroshima, the only two cases of using a nuclear weapon against civilians.


Today in labor history: first general strike in Canada held

The first general strike in Canadian history was held in Vancouver on this day in 1918, organized as a 1-day political protest against the killing of draft evader and labor activist Albert "Ginger" Goodwin.


Today in labor history: Daniel Defoe pilloried for defending dissent

Legend has it that Defoe's poem struck such a chord with the public that they threw flowers and drank to his health.


Today in labor history: United Farm Workers sign contract with Calif. grape industry

The contract covered 10,000 workers and provided seniority, hiring, and a medical plan. 


Today in labor history: Farrell Dobbs born

Dobbs first became a pro-labor activist after witnessing the plight of workers during the Great Depression in the 1930s.


Today in labor history: Emma Lazarus born in 1849

Emma Lazarus, the poet who wrote "The New Colossus," was born July 22, 1849.

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