Labor News

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Today in labor history: "Scab" used for the first time

On this day in 1816 the term "scab" was coined by the Albany Typographical Union in reference to strike breaking.

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Today in Labor History: Football strike ends

On this day in 1982, the National Football League Association ended a strike that lasted 57 days.

 

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Today in labor history: “The Agitator” first published

During its run, the tabloid advocated industrial unionism, free speech, sexual freedom, and support for the Industrial Workers of the World.

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Today in labor history: U.S. women organize trade union league

Working-class and wealthier women gathered in Boston to found the Women's Trade Union League to support the efforts of women to organize labor unions.

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Today in Labor History: General strike in New Orleans

Today in 1892, the New Orleans general strike, which was comprised of both black and white workers, began.

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Today in Labor History: The Palmer Raids

Today in 1919 the infamous Palmer Raids began.

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On this day in labor history: National Organization for Women founded

On this date in 1863, at the height of the American Civil War, 18 countries met in Geneva to create the International Red Cross.

 

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Today in labor history: Women’s rights figure Elizabeth Cady Stanton dies

On this day in 1902, social/political activist and proto-feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton died, after living a life of achievements.

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Today in labor history: The 40-hour workweek

On October 24, 1940 the 40-hour workweek went into effect under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The new law had been signed by President Roosevelt in 1938.

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