Labor News

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Today in labor history: Black inventor Henry Blair patents cotton planter

In 1857 patent rights were denied to slaves and were restored after the Civil War. Blair died in 1860, the year the war began.

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Today in Latino History: Cuba declares independence from Spain

The revolt was led by Carlos Manuel de Céspedes.  Céspedes, himself a plantation owner, freed his slaves and invited them to join the rebellion.

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Today in Latino history: Mexico becomes a republic

On Oct. 4, 1824, three years after winning independence from Spain and battling the remnants of monarchy, the Mexican people established a republic.

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Today in Latino history: First Latino to appear in World Series

Luque played in both all white, Negro League, and integrated teams in the U.S. and Cuba.

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Today in labor history: Nat Turner is born

Turner often conducted Baptist services, preaching the Bible to his fellow slaves, who dubbed him "The Prophet."

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Today in labor history: 10,000-plus dockers locked out

Pacific Maritime Association, a coalition of corporate shipping giants, locked out 10,500 longshore workers today in 2002.

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Salt of the Earth Labor College celebrates 20th anniversary

TUCSON, Ariz. - When activists here launched Salt of the Earth Labor College in 1993 they didn't know exactly what to expect.

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Ethiopian immigrant Tefere Gebre shakes up labor organizing

Gebre's first attempt at union organizing in Orange County was a smashing success. He successfully signed up 400 workers who toiled as sorters of trash.

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Today in labor history: Motley becomes first black woman federal judge

On Aug. 30, 1966, civil rights lawyer Constance Baker Motley became the first African American woman to serve as a federal judge.

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Today in labor history: First African-American pilot recognized posthumously

Bullard was rejected by the U.S. Army Air Service because only white pilots were allowed to serve.

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