Today in Labor History: Fighting Mary and Mother Jones

On November 30, 1854, "Fighting Mary" Eliza McDowell, also known as the "Angel of the Stockyards," was born in Chicago.


Today in Labor History: Medical interns win right to unionize

On this date in 1999, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that medical interns could unionize and negotiate.


Today in labor history: Photo engravers go on strike

During this time, 20,000 other newspaper workers represented by other unions refused to cross the photo engravers' picket lines.


Today in labor history: Workers perform "Pins and Needles" on Broadway

Nov. 27, 1937, the pro-labor musical revue, "Pins & Needles," opens on Broadway with a cast of International Ladies Garment Workers Union members.


Today in labor history: "Scab" used for the first time

On this day in 1816 the term "scab" was coined by the Albany Typographical Union in reference to strike breaking.


Today in Labor History: Football strike ends

On this day in 1982, the National Football League Association ended a strike that lasted 57 days.



Today in labor history: “The Agitator” first published

During its run, the tabloid advocated industrial unionism, free speech, sexual freedom, and support for the Industrial Workers of the World.


Today in labor history: U.S. women organize trade union league

Working-class and wealthier women gathered in Boston to found the Women's Trade Union League to support the efforts of women to organize labor unions.


Today in Labor History: General strike in New Orleans

Today in 1892, the New Orleans general strike, which was comprised of both black and white workers, began.


Today in Labor History: The Palmer Raids

Today in 1919 the infamous Palmer Raids began.