On this day in labor history: National Organization for Women founded

On this date in 1863, at the height of the American Civil War, 18 countries met in Geneva to create the International Red Cross.



Today in labor history: Women’s rights figure Elizabeth Cady Stanton dies

On this day in 1902, social/political activist and proto-feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton died, after living a life of achievements.


Today in labor history: The 40-hour workweek

On October 24, 1940 the 40-hour workweek went into effect under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The new law had been signed by President Roosevelt in 1938.


Today in labor history: First school strike against corporal punishment

Today in 1889, the first nationwide school strike against corporal punishment - in Great Britain - took place.


Today in labor history: John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry

Brown, a minister and fierce opponent of slavery, sought to obtain weapons from the arsenal to defeat the slaveocracy in the South. John Brown and his men were captured and executed.


Today in labor history: Vietnam war protests, draft card burned

On Oct. 15, 1965, a young Catholic Worker activist, David Miller, burned his draft card in protest of the U.S. war in Vietnam, becoming the first antiwar activist to challenge a law banning the act.


Today in Labor History: Ike apologizes for racist treatment of Ghana official

Eisenhower tried to quiet an international outcry Ghana's finance minister was refused service in a U.S. restaurant because of his skin color.


Today in labor history: “Boom boom room” costs Wall Street in sex bias payout

Branch managers had been asking female employees to remove their tops in exchange for money. One office featured a "boom boom room" where women were told to "entertain" clients.

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