October

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Today in labor history: Seminole Indian resistance came to a head

Conflict carried on until the war ended in August 1842, when the Indians were force-marched to Oklahoma.

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Today in labor history: Earl Lloyd became the first black player in NBA

Born in Virginia, Lloyd attended West Virginia state.  He was selected in the 9th round NBA draft.

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Today in labor history: Underground Railroad leader Levi Coffin born

He strongly advocated for aid to the freed slaves to enable them to take their full place in American society.

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Today in labor history: 40 hour week and minimum wage

October 24 marks events in two of the most significant struggles by workers in U.S. history: for shorter hours and better wages.

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Today in labor history: NAACP sends "Appeal to the World" to the UN

The U.S. delegation to the UN, which included NAACP board member Eleanor Roosevelt, refused to introduce the petition.

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Today in labor History: First Medicine Lodge Treaty signed

The Medicine Lodge Treaty is the overall name for three treaties signed between the United States government and southern Plains Indian tribes in October 1867.

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Today in labor history: General Motors agrees to end employment discrimination

The turnaround came ten years after the commission had filed a complaint that African Americans, Latinos, other minorities, and women were being unfairly treated.

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Today in labor history: “Salt of the Earth” strike begins

The film was written/directed/produced by members of the original "Hollywood Ten," who were blacklisted for their refusal to cooperate with the government witch hunts against communists.

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Today in labor history: Black inventor Henry Blair patents cotton planter

In 1857 patent rights were denied to slaves and were restored after the Civil War. Blair died in 1860, the year the war began.

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Today in Latino History: Cuba declares independence from Spain

The revolt was led by Carlos Manuel de Céspedes.  Céspedes, himself a plantation owner, freed his slaves and invited them to join the rebellion.

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