Science & Environment

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Climate change already impacting U.S., report confirms

In the eastern U.S., the number of extreme weather events, including very heavy rain events, has increased already.

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Today in eco-history: Death and destruction in Bangladesh

On this day in 1991, a powerful cyclone with winds over 150 mph hit Bangladesh. At least 138,000 people were killed and most food crops were washed away or destroyed.

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Today in eco-history: Michigan struck by deadly F5 tornado

Known as the Hudsonville-Standale Tornado, it was part of a large, deadly outbreak of 49 tornadoes that affected the Great Plains, parts of the South, and the upper Midwest. 

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Weathering the floods in England

At long last the army has arrived on the Somerset Levels (a coastal area in South West England) where floodwaters have been disrupting normal life since just after Christmas.

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Cold? Really, it’s warmer than ever

Winters have been warming rapidly in the majority of the continental 48 states since 1970. And, take note Chicago and other Midwest readers: The coldest states are warming the fastest.

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Climate change is not just about the weather

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is in the process of finalizing the different sections of its massive every-seven-years report. 

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Coming typhoon an ill wind for nuke-nervous Japan

The typhoon will bring hurricane-force winds, rain, and flooding to a city that is already enduring the now-global Fukushima disaster.

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Atmosphere's carbon dioxide breaches 400

Many climate scientists, such as James Hansen of NASA's Goddard Institute, believe that any sustained period of time with higher than 350 ppm threatens catastrophic global warming.

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Extreme weather: the Maya and us

Scientists and realistic politicians are now saying that Sandy-like events will be increasing in frequency as the earth continues to heat.